HOT BLAST: MLB's Opening Day and the money players make
Apr 01, 2013 | 1950 views |  0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cincinnati Reds grounds crew members prepare the field ready at Great American Ball Park for Monday's opening day baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Sunday in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Cincinnati Reds grounds crew members prepare the field ready at Great American Ball Park for Monday's opening day baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Sunday in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
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Today is an unofficial, yet altogether important, holiday for me. It's Opening Day for Major League Baseball. I should have called in sick.

(Yes, ESPN hosted the "official" Opening Day game last night, but I boycotted and watched "The Walking Dead" instead. Opening Day should always be on Monday, and the first game should always be an 11 a.m. start in Cincinnati, but I digress.)

There are all sorts of story angles to the beginning of a season, but I can't help but feed my continual curiosity with the salaries of MLB players. Unlike most other professional sports, MLB does not have a traditional salary cap, and that allows team owners to spend as much money as they have (and wish) on players. It creates haves and have-nots, and it makes small-market teams like Pittsburgh, Oakland, Kansas City and Minnesota work doubly harder to acquire and retain talent. But that's a whole other story. Bottom line: If you're athletic and can play several sports, you'd be asinine not to play baseball. The risk is worth it.

Take a look at these salaries. Alex Rodriguez remains baseball's highest-paid player and will make $28 million this season. (And he's hurt and out for a while.) The list is pure fantasy to most of us, but it's real to the players.

 If you're a baseball fan, scroll down the list and look at the innumerable number of decent-but-not-great players making more than $10 million this season. It's crazy. But it's the way the game's business model plays, even if it's not healthy for the long-term health of MLB.

Nevertheless, I'm happy it's Opening Day. Elated, in fact.

— Phillip Tutor

 
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