HOT BLAST: A messy party makeover
May 30, 2013 | 1943 views |  0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jeb Bush: "Many voters are simply unwilling to choose our candidates, even though they share our core beliefs, because those voters feel unloved, unwanted and unwelcome.” (AP file photo)
Jeb Bush: "Many voters are simply unwilling to choose our candidates, even though they share our core beliefs, because those voters feel unloved, unwanted and unwelcome.” (AP file photo)
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The National Journal has rough news for Republicans hoping to polish the party's negative image:

"For all the lip service given by Republicans to the party's efforts to modernize its image, a quick look at the GOP's standing in two must-win battlegrounds doesn't paint a promising picture of their efforts. In Colorado and Virginia—the archetypes of suburban, demographically changing states—Republicans are barely contesting next year's Senate races, are facing fresh setbacks in the two pivotal upcoming gubernatorial races, and are dealing with persistent issues recruiting new talent into the pipeline."

Of course, the case is different in Alabama and other Southern states where Republicans rule the roost, holding a dominant advantage over Democrats.

The national issue, the Journal reports is, "These swing states are important precisely because they contain significant and growing numbers of the rising American electorate—Hispanics, single women, and young, college-educated voters—that are necessary for Republicans to win over for their long-term health."

During a speech earlier this year, Jeb Bush, the former governor of Florida, said: "Way too many people believe Republicans are anti- immigrant, anti-woman, anti-science, anti-gay, anti-worker. .. Many voters are simply unwilling to choose our candidates, even though they share our core beliefs, because those voters feel unloved, unwanted and unwelcome.”

And speaking on "Fox News Sunday" this week, Bob Dole, former Kansas senator and 1996 Republican nominee for president, said of his party: "I think they ought to put a sign on the National Committee doors that says closed for repairs until New Year’s Day next year and spend that time going over ideas and positive agenda." 

This is hardly new. The Republican Party's Growth and Opportunity Project noted much the same in March: "Public perception of the Party is at record lows. Young voters are increasingly rolling their eyes at what the Party represents, and many minorities wrongly think that Republicans do not like them or want them in the country. When someone rolls their eyes at us, they are not likely to open their ears to us."

All this is happening, the National Journal notes, "in what's shaping up to be a promising political environment for Republicans" in the 2014 elections.
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